CS Talk: Steven M. Bellovin (Columbia U.)

Authentication Revisited

We all know about authentication -- passwords, two factors, biometrics, and more. But what are the real underlying properties of these different types? Are passwords as bad as portrayed? Why? What are the failure modes of other types of authentication? How should they be used? Is there an underlying framework we can use, for today's and tomorrow's authentication schemes?


Biography:
Steven M. Bellovin is the Percy K. and Vidal L. W. Hudson Professor of Computer Science at Columbia University and member of the Cybersecurity and Privacy Center of the university's Data Science Institute. He does research on security and privacy and on related public policy issues. In his copious spare professional time, he does some work on the history of cryptography. He joined the faculty in 2005 after many years at Bell Labs and AT&T Labs Research, where he was an AT&T Fellow. He received a BA degree from Columbia University, and an MS and PhD in Computer Science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. While a graduate student, he helped create Netnews; for this, he and the other perpetrators were given the 1995 Usenix Lifetime Achievement Award (The Flame). Bellovin has served as Chief Technologist of the Federal Trade Commission and as the Technology Scholar at the Privacy and Civil Liberties Board. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and is serving on the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. In the past, he has been a member of the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Advisory Committee, and the Technical Guidelines Development Committee of the Election Assistance Commission; he has also received the 2007 NIST/NSA National Computer Systems Security Award and has been elected to the Cybersecurity Hall of Fame.

Bellovin is the author of Thinking Security and the co-author of Firewalls and Internet Security: Repelling the Wily Hacker, and holds a number of patents on cryptographic and network protocols. He has served on many National Research Council study committees, including those on information systems trustworthiness, the privacy implications of authentication technologies, and cybersecurity research needs; he was also a member of the information technology subcommittee of an NRC study group on science versus terrorism. He was a member of the Internet Architecture Board from 1996-2002; he was co-director of the Security Area of the IETF from 2002 through 2004.

Friday, September 15 at 10:00am

STM 326

Event Type

Academic Events

Departments

Georgetown College, Computer Science

Website

https://cs.georgetown.edu/event

Event Contact Name

Nazli Goharian

Event Contact Email

nazli@ir.cs.georgetown.edu

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