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Economic Migrants and Displaced People in Azerbaijan

Tuesday, January 22, 2013 at 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Edward B. Bunn, S.J. Intercultural Center, ICC 462 37th and O St., N.W., Washington

Economic migrants and displaced people of present-day Azerbaijan represent according to some estimates, roughly one in four and one in eleven members of the population, respectively.

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Jennifer S. Wistrand received her PhD in anthropology from Washington University in St. Louis. She is currently a visiting Research Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson Center?s Kennan Institute in Washington, DC. Her research interests are Islam, migration, refugees and IDPs, education and gender in the former Soviet Muslim-majority republics in the Caucasus and Central Asia.

During the Soviet period, most if not all of the republics were home to peoples who had been forced to relocate from one region of the federation to another. At the same time, many of the republics, especially those in the Caucasus and Central Asia, had some members who regularly migrated, often to Russia, for educational or economic reasons. When the Soviet Union collapsed, however, the status of these various populations changed. This talk, which draws upon twenty-two months of ethnographic fieldwork, will focus on the economic migrants and displaced people of present-day Azerbaijan, who represent, according to some estimates, roughly one in four and one in eleven members of the population, respectively. Particular attention will be paid to the educational and economic consequences of being the child of an economic migrant or displaced person.

The Center for Eurasian, Russian and East European Studies (CERES) at Georgetown University directs one of the nation's preeminent Master's degree programs and hosts a rich outreach program of events on the region, for K-12 educators and audiences in Washington, DC, and nationwide.

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